Illustrated Articles

Dogs + Nutrition

  • Bladder stones can be a significant problem for dogs and finding out what type of stone is present will help determine if it can be dissolved, as well as make a plan to prevent recurrence. Bladder stones set the stage for chronic urinary tract infection, and some bladder stones (struvites) grow more quickly if the dog already has a urinary tract infection. Diet selection play a large role in this and it is important to follow veterinarian recommended nutrient profiles to prevent recurrence.

  • It is important to understand the unique nutritional needs of performance dogs. Their success depends upon a combination of genetics, training, and nutrition. It is important to match the nutrient profile to the individual dog and the activity. Your veterinarian can assist you in making optimal nutritional choices for your canine athlete.

  • Obesity is the most common preventable disease in dogs affecting up to 45% of the North American dog population. Obesity contributes to disease including diabetes, arthritis, hypertension, and cancer eventually causing a decreased lifespan. Obesity can be controlled with diet and exercise plans. Regular visits to the veterinarian for body condition assessment and weight checks are crucial to weight loss as is maintaining the recommended dietary intake.

  • Obesity is a very common problem in dogs and leads to many health problems including an increased risk of diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and many types of cancer. Extra body fat causes increased inflammation in the body, worsening osteoarthritis. If there is already evidence of OA, reducing inflammation and pain will help encourage your dog to become more active, which in turn will speed up appropriate weight loss. Obesity can be prevented or reversed by being aware of calorie intake, body condition, and exercise.

  • Pharyngostomy tubes are placed through the skin of the neck behind the jaw through the pharynx, into the esophagus to enable ongoing nutrition in dogs that either refuse to eat or are unable to chew and swallow food. A diet will be recommended by your veterinarian but must be liquefied with water before it can pass through the tube. Step-by-step instructions are given for tube feeding. The decision to remove the tube needs to be determined by your veterinarian.

  • This handout provides general information on feeding and training your puppy, nail care, and hiccupping.

Hospital News

Welcome!

Summerfields Animal Hospital provides fear free, friendly and compassionate veterinary care for dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets and exotics in the North Fort Worth, Keller, Saginaw and Watagua areas of Texas.

When sick, you want only the best care for your faithful pet companion. We work hard to provide exceptional care for your pet and outstanding customer service in a state of the art environment.

Our website was designed to educate you about your pet, our hospital, our experienced veterinarian and the excellent services in veterinary medicine we provide.

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 9:00pm
Tuesday7:30am – 6:00pm
Wednesday7:30am – 6:00pm
Thursday7:30am – 6:00pm
Friday7:30am – 9:00pm
Saturday7:30am – 9:00pm
Sunday2:00pm – 9:00pm

Emergency Process

All after hour emergencies are referred to:

AIRPORT FREEWAY ANIMAL EMERGENCY CLINIC, P. C.
833 W. Airport Fwy
Euless · 76040
(817) 571-2088

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