Illustrated Articles

Dogs + Treatment

  • The general instructions for incision care are the same for all surgical incisions. There may be some differences, however, depending on the type of surgery and the material used to close the incision. This handout is a guide to caring for your cat's surgical incision(s) at home for optimal recovery.

  • Cefpodoxime is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic used to treat skin infections in dogs. It is also used off-label in cats and to treat other types of infection. It is given orally in tablet or liquid form. Side effects are uncommon. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Cephalexin (brand names Rilexine®, Keflex®, Vetolexin®) is an oral antibiotic used to treat pyoderma and other bacterial skin infections in dogs and is used off-label in cats to treat pyoderma and other types of skin infections. It is sometimes used off-label to treat urinary tract infections in cats and dogs. Side effects of cephalexin are rare and usually mild.

  • Cetirizine is given by mouth and is used off-label to treat and prevent pruritus (itching) associated with atopic dermatitis, urticaria (hives), and insect bite reactions in cats and dogs. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include vomiting and increased salivation. Do not use it in pets that are allergic to it or hydroxyzine. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Corneal dystrophy is a term used to describe several conditions that occur in dogs and cause the corneas to become opaque. There are three major categories of corneal dystrophy: epithelial, stromal, and endothelial. Each is named by the anatomic location of the abnormal tissue and opacity.

  • This handout discusses the use of cryosurgery in pets. This technique involves the use of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissues. A short discussion in included as to how the technique is used, and in what circumstances it may be appropriate to use.

  • Treatment for Cushing’s disease using mitotane involves two phases: initiating phase and maintenance phase. Monitoring your dog’s food and water intake is very important. This handout provides detailed treatment instructions for dogs prescribed mitotane. Follow your veterinarian’s instructions carefully and report changes in your dog’s behavior to your veterinarian.

  • Ethylene glycol, a sweet-tasting, odorless liquid, is the active ingredient in antifreeze. Ethylene glycol can also be found, in lower concentrations, in some windshield de-icing agents, hydraulic brake fluid, motor oils, solvents, paints, film processing solutions, wood stains, inks, printer cartridges, etc.

  • Exercise restriction refers to the act of intentionally limiting a pet’s physical activity. Veterinarians often recommend exercise restriction to allow a pet to heal after a surgical procedure or injury, although it may also be recommended to prevent worsening of a medical condition. Different circumstances require different degrees of exercise restriction, so your veterinarian’s guidance is essential when implementing exercise restriction.

  • Insect stings or bites can cause mild signs of swelling, pain, and itching or can be more severe causing hives, anaphylactic reactions, difficulty breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, or seizures. If the sting or bite has been observed, look for the insect or spider to allow identification. Look for a stinger and carefully remove it without squeezing more venom out of the venom sac. Depending on the severity of the reaction, first aid including cool packing the area, dosing with oral antihistamine, and prevention of self-trauma may be all that is needed; however, in more severe cases emergency veterinary attention is required to stabilize the dog, screen for organ dysfunction, and provide supportive care.

Hospital News

Welcome!

Summerfields Animal Hospital is a full-service, AAHA accredited animal hospital for small pets including dogs, cats, avian and exotics.

We understand and value the mutual affection, trust and loyalty that bind owners with their pets and believe the best approach to preserve that relationship is through practicing excellent medicine.

When sick, you want only the best care for your faithful pet companion. We work hard to provide exceptional care for your pet and outstanding customer service in a state-of-the-art environment.

Our website was designed to educate you about your pet, our hospital, our experienced veterinarians and the excellent services in veterinary medicine we provide.

Location Hours
Monday7:30am – 7:00pm
Tuesday7:30am – 7:00pm
Wednesday7:30am – 7:00pm
Thursday7:30am – 7:00pm
Friday7:30am – 7:00pm
Saturday7:30am – 7:00pm
Sunday2:00pm – 7:00pm

Emergency Process

We accept any emergency patient during regular business hours.

If possible, please call our office to let us know the details of your emergency so that we may be prepared for your arrival.

(817) 485-8511

Google+